P.art® (Parametric Applied Research Team) at AKT II is a research based practice that seeks innovation in design and construction through the close integration of research and practice; the development of tools and new fabrication methods. Through its work, which is based on a rigorous structured approach to design, they have developed new rational geometric organizations, form-finding techniques and efficient material systems.

Ed Tibuzzi

Ed Tibuzzi {Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering} is a designer and researcher based in London(UK). In 2007 he joined Adams Kara Taylor (now AKTII) and shortly after became member of its parametric applied research unit (p.art®) Subsequently to his degree he developed a profound interest for parametric design. Uncertainty modelling, quantification and mitigation, multi-scale modelling of structures and multidisciplinary design optimization are part of his daily research. During his work at AKTII, he has completed various projects, in particular BMW Pavilion and Coca-Cola Beat-box (London 2012 Olympic Park), He collaborates with KTH University in Stockholm and Tor Vergata University in Rome, running various lectures and workshops. He co-led a cluster in 2013 Smart Geometry.

Coca Cola Beatbox

Coca Cola Beatbox

Based on a reciprocal triangular tilling of prismatic units, the facade of the Coca Cola pavilion is a rigid, self supporting structure of 5×1 metre ETFE pillows, acting as interlocking air beams to form a cylindrical facade. This facade wraps around two spiralling ramps and an internal drum of a building to create a responsive, animated and musical three dimensional curtain, giving the pavilion its name, Beatbox.

BMW Group Olympic Pavillion

BMW Group Olympic Pavillion

The BMW Olympic pavillion, despite the modest dimension is a complex piece of architecture and engineering. Above the hidden infrastructure of the lower deck, little in terms of structure meets the eye, with all technical services integrated within a lightweight cellular steel upper deck also supporting the pool of water that spills over the edge to form the water curtains. Above the water-cube, 10 pod structures are connected by bridges over the water, each consisting of a timber floor and thin curved roof-shell structures spanning up to 15m over needle-thin steel columns. Constructed in simple timber ply and joists, these stress-skins consist of two one-inch cross laminated ply sheets separated by grillage of simple timber joists; an inexpensive but extremely efficient construction which uses principles of boat building technology. These simple but elegant structures were achievable through a parametric digital-to-fabrication process which converted the complex curved forms into complete sets of cutting profiles for the fabrication of the joists and ply sheets, complete with a detailed assembly manual.